Mailbox Monday

Mailbox Monday is a weekly blog link up hosted by Leslie of Under My Apple Tree, Serena of Savvy Verse & Wit and Martha of Reviews by Martha’s Bookshelf.

Been offline recently on my blog and instagram, work has been so busy now covering additional hours due to staff absence. And Wales has been put into another two week lockdown, so just feeling blah. I haven’t finished a book ages.

I have picked up some new books over the last few weeks, in The Works 3 for £5 deal.


Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they’re crazy, but it’s the perfect solution: Leon occupies the one-bed flat while Tiffy’s at work in the day, and she has the run of the place the rest of the time.

But with obsessive ex-boyfriends, demanding clients at work, wrongly imprisoned brothers and, of course, the fact that they stillhaven’t met yet, they’re about to discover that if you want the perfect home you need to throw the rulebook out the window…


Murder wasn’t the hard part. It was just the start of the game.

Joshua Kane has been preparing for this moment his whole life. He’s done it before. But this is the big one.

This is the murder trial of the century. And Kane has killed to get the best seat in the house.

But there’s someone on his tail. Someone who suspects that the killer isn’t the man on trial.

Kane knows time is running out – he just needs to get to the conviction without being discovered.


Meet the Bright Young Things, the rabble-rousing hedonists of the 1920s whose treasure hunts were a media obsession. One such game takes place at the 18th birthday party of Pamela Mitford, but ends in tragedy as cruel, charismatic Adrian Curtis is pushed to his death from the church neighbouring the Mitford home.

The police quickly identify the killer as a maid, Dulcie. But Louisa Cannon, chaperone to the Mitford girls and a former criminal herself, believes Dulcie to be innocent, and sets out to clear the girl’s name . . . all while the real killer may only be steps away.


I also won a giveaway on Instagram and received this book off my wish list.

How do you solve a mystery when you can’t remember the clues?

Maud is forgetful. She makes a cup of tea and doesn’t remember to drink it. She goes to the shops and forgets why she went. Sometimes her home is unrecognizable – or her daughter Helen seems a total stranger.

But there’s one thing Maud is sure of: her friend Elizabeth is missing. The note in her pocket tells her so. And no matter who tells her to stop going on about it, to leave it alone, to shut up, Maud will get to the bottom of it.

Because somewhere in Maud’s damaged mind lies the answer to an unsolved seventy-year-old mystery. One everyone has forgotten about. 

Everyone, except Maud . . .


And the last book I have added to my collection recently was a price drop on amazon a few weeks ago. I have been binge watching Ambulance on BBC1 so interested to read this book. On checking this book is still only £3 on amazon.

A teenage boy lies on the pavement, bleeding from a stab wound; a distraught mum watches, in mute shock, as her daughter suffers a terrifying fatal asthma attack; a young girl is gang-raped and her stricken boyfriend takes an overdose; a disturbed young man flings himself in front of a speeding train at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

Few people can imagine living in a world where such situations are part of everyday life. Yet for veteran paramedic Lysa Walder, these and thousands of other emergency call outs are part of a day’s work: scenes of tragedy, heroism loss and horror – but also stories of triumph and humour.

Lysa has been a paramedic for over twenty years, working for the London Ambulance service – the world’s biggest and busiest free service – for much of that time. Here, she reveals what it’s really like to work in a job that brings paramedic teams face-to-face with death – and destiny – every day.


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